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answers questions from parliament about the phone hacking scandal. that's after media mogul rupert murdoch and his son testified yesterday. the bbc's nick robinson reports from london. >> reporter: the policemen, in case you wondered, are there to protect rupert and james murdoch, not take them in for questioning. the tycoon's wife windi was behind him offering physical and emotional support. his son and once heir apparent sat anxiously and protectively at his side throughout. >> i would like to say as well just how sorry i am and how sorry we are. >> reporter: they were sorry. they were humble. but who's fault was the criminality in their company? >> mr. rdoch, do you accept ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> you are not responsible? who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> reporter: who that was, he wouldn't say. >> this is not as an excuse. maybe it's an explanation. "the news of the world" is less than 1% of our company. i employ 53,000 people around the world. >> reporter: in recent years, news i
three military lawyers to represent him instead. >>> media moug angle rupert murdoch is back in the u.s. this morning after testifying about the phone-hacking scandal in london. the british prime minister then took murdoch's place. >> reporter: the british. they are so polite. except when it comes to politics. >> the reply that he sent -- >> reporter: that's david cameron, the british prime minister. >> you know -- aah -- >> reporter: facing 138 withering questions from the opposition. >> he just doesn't get it. >> reporter: no american president gets subjected to a verbal pounding like this. >> he should apologize for the catastrophic error of judgment he made. >> reporter: the issue is cameron too close to rupert murdoch and his now-tainted company? >> it shows my staff behaved entirely properly. [ jeering ] >> reporter: they call this a debate. but to the speaker of the house, it is, well, childish. >> calm themselves, keep on an even keel, it's better for their health and the house. >> reporter: this scandal may not seem like a big deal from afar but it's already left the prime mi
against james murdoch, the son of media mogul rupert murdoch. the testimony he gave british lawmakers on tuesday about the ongoing phone hacking and bribery scandal is being questioned by a former adviser, among others. they say murdoch knew about the extent of the hacking years ago and that there's e-mail evidence to back that up. >>> a california judge is telling lindsay lohan to get cracking on her community service. lohan was told yesterday that she needs to complete 480 hours of service by next april and there will be no extension. also, lohan was told she must enroll in psychological counselling. she has to complete three anti-shoplifting classes by her next court appearance in october. >>> do you own apple stock? if you do you'll like this story. apple is on the verge of becoming the world's most valuable company. with more than 6 billion in cash on hand, the company may be looking to buy the online video service hulu. neal karlinsky reports. >> reporter: there's the ecocomy that we all live and breathe. stagnant growth and lingering unemployment. and then there's apple. >> app
questions about what rupert murdoch's son knew about phone hacking by reporterst the now closed newspaper "news of the world." on tuesday james murdoch told british lawmakers he was unaware of the full extent of the illegal behavior but one of his former advisers and a former editor says that's not true and that e-mail evidence shows murdoch likely knew about it all years ago. >> officials are forcibly medicating jared loughner, the suspect in january's shooting rampage. his attorneys claim that violates a court order not to do so. the involuntary treatment began monday after it was decided that loughner was an immediate danger to himself. >>> as much of the nation tries to cool down, one pennsylvania county is actually turning the ac off. officials in bucks county near philadelphia held meetings outdoors as they tried out what's being called a power curtailment program. the plan is to save $250,000 by turning off the ac on certain days. needless to say those employees are not too happy, not to mention extremely hot. >> i cannot even imagine. the reasononhy taking a look at the weather f
. here's abc'c' jeffrey kofman. >> reporter:r: rupert murdoch rushed to london today to rescue the media empire he's spent his life building. he was reading the last issue of "the news of the world" as he came in. the best receiving tabloid was on the news stands here for the last time. >> i think if you've done wrong, you should face the consequences. >> reporter: the paper brought down by the criminal excesses of its reporters. but in the eyes of many, it was brought down by management who still refuses to accept its own ro role. but murdoch may lose a huge business deal. his plan to take 100% control of britain's b-sky-b satellite network this ask scandal has highlight what people consider a monopoly. 40% of the papers told in this country are ownedy murdoch companies. his holdings stretch around the world. in the u.s., he owns two of the most influential newspapers, book pubbishing, avatar, his, 20th century fox. fox news and fox. owner of "thee simpsons." >> all right, break it up, boys. >> suppose you don't like tabloid newspapers, either. >> reporter: news corporation is headquart
rupert murdoch is on a hotter hot seat tonight, and it's here in this country. congressman peter king says there are credible questions tonight about whether reporters at murdoch's tabloid papers tapped the phones of 9/11 victims, digging for details of their private anguish. king is asking the fbi to move in on murdoch's news corp, right here in the u.s. >>> and, our consumer watchdog report tonight, tackabling a sly scam on your phone bill. a new report about hidden fees costing consumers billions each year. it's called cramming. and today, we learned about the phone companies letting this happen. here's abc's linsey davis. >> reporter: as larry vido's phone bill grew, so did his suspicions. little did he know, he was also paying $14.95 for something called voicemail monthly fee. and another 8.23 for something called my billing service monthly fee. both charges were fraudulent. >> how could this happen? how could somebody start charging my account, i guess, similar to charging my credit card without my knowledgdg >> reporter: in a hearing today, we learned larry is one of as many as
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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